Posts tagged ‘#payroll management’

March 25, 2014

Best Practice for Relying on Fair Work Ombudsman Advice


I came across a press release a little while back from Senator Eric Abetz, Minister for Employment titled Small Business Able to Rely on Fair Work Ombudsman Advice. The opening sentence of this press release reads:

“In a win for small business, the Minister for Employment Senator Eric Abetz today announced that small business operators will now be able to rely on advice from the Fair Work Ombudsman without the fear of prosecution, should the information be incorrect.”

My thought on this is simply… How Ridiculous!

1. Ridiculous that you can’t get correct advice from Fair Work in the first place.
2. Ridiculous that the press release leads small business operators to think that they won’t be prosecuted for following incorrect advice, because Fair Work are reluctant to put their advice in writing, which makes it very hard to build a case on the advice they actually gave you at the time.
3. Ridiculous that a statement like this will lead small business to unrealistically expect that they can prove the content of a phone call if a case was actually made against them by Fair Work.
4. Ridiculous because my experience has shown me that you need to ask the right questions, to get the right advice from not only Fair Work, but of all payroll and employer association advice lines.

My advice to anyone seeking information from Fair Work, that involves a compliance issue that you could be later prosecuted or fined for (which in reality is very question you would ever have of the Fair Work Ombudsman), is that you get that information in writing as it may ultimately become evidence that you require to defend your actions.

To ensure you don’t venture into the grey area on seeking advice, it would be wise to follow these four best practices when seeking legislative advice:

1. Do your research – don’t go in blind.  Before you make an enquiry with Fair Work, investigate your question as much as you can via the Fair Work website and Google to understand the anomalies that may exist in relation to your enquiry, because most HR, Payroll and Industrial Relations questions rely on understanding multiple pieces of legislation and awards, and more often than not multiple clauses and sub clauses of each of these to reach your final definitive answer.

My own experience with many self-proclaimed payroll “subject matter experts” and having made more phone calls to Fair Work than I can remember, has proven time and again that misinformation is rife.

2. Beware of how you frame your questions and what questions you ask.  Asking the right questions is essential, which is an awfully hard ask if you are inexperienced and are expecting your information provider to be the holder of all wisdom.

It is better to ask ten questions than one, to ensure you and the person providing the advice completely understand the questions, the intent of the questions and the answers being offered. There are quite often “but if”, or “except in the case of” exceptions that apply to employment law and you may not be receiving all of the information you require, if your questioning is misleading or incomplete.

Again, this is why it’s important to research and have a little background knowledge on the question/s you are trying to answer and to always think “how will this advice stand up in court”.

3. Get it in writing!  Everything in payroll and HR is a potential legal issue and your best defence in a legal matter is evidence. Again, when seeking advice, utilise email where you can for a clear audit trail and ask to be directed to documented evidence of the advice you are receiving, so you can print that out as well, such as the published pay rates, or the clauses of the applicable legislative documents, or a publication on the Fair Work website.

Fair Work have made it impossible to get a direct response to a question in writing. They offer only a telephone advice line, or an out of office hours email service, from which they will ring you back within 5 days (which someone at Fair Work mistakenly thinks is customer service). They used to have an online chat facility, that enabled you to print out the conversation, but that’s been shut down. The only “in writing” response you can get from Fair Work these days is to print out information they have available on their website.

Seeking legislative advice via telephone (from any source including employer and payroll/HR associations) is a last resort and where this is your only option, you should ensure your questions are all documented and as each question is answered, document the advice you receive. The date and time of the phone call also needs to be documented, along with the full name and position of the person you spoke to.

4. Double Check the Advice…  Any advice that you receive from an individual should be verified and with the volume of information freely available on the internet, verification is not hard to accomplish. Whether that individual is your payroll officer, an accountant, a Fair Work representative or a telephone advisor from an association, you cannot be sure of their ability to correctly interpret legislation or their wealth of experience in doing so.

I’m probably not telling you anything new, by stating that employment legislation is complex, multi-faceted and relatively difficult to stay fully abreast of unless that is your full time role.

When you seek advice from an organisation who professes to be the font of knowledge you would expect that their advice should be gospel, but that is not always the case.

The law holds the owners, directors and responsible officers of the business liable for compliance and ignorance of the law is never an excuse for non-compliance. As such it is your responsibility to ensure you have full information, correct interpretation or a damn good defence case.

 

 

If you have any questions you would like to raise personally, please email Louise Vidler at The Professional Payroll Manager.

© 2014 Louise Vidler T/As The Professional Payroll Manager.  All rights reserved.

All materials contained on this web site not otherwise subject to copyright of other parties are subject to the ownership rights of Louise Vidler T/As The Professional Payroll Manager. Louise Vidler T/As The Professional Payroll Manager authorises you to make a single copy of the content herein for your own personal, non-commercial, use while visiting the site. You agree that any copy made must include the Louise Vidler T/As The Professional Payroll Manager copyright notice in full. No other permission is granted to you to print, copy, reproduce, distribute, transmit, upload, download, store, display in public, alter, or modify the content contained on this web site.

March 23, 2014

Payrollers! Are You Prepared for the New Australian Privacy Principles in force on March 12, 2014?


privacy

The new Australian Privacy Principles came into effect on March 12, 2014 and replace the National Privacy Principles and apply to all organisations (with some exceptions), as well as Australian government agencies.

The objective of the Principles is to ensure that organisations manage personal information in “an open and transparent way” and some of the key areas that relate to payroll functions include:

  • All organisations must take reasonable steps to implement practices, procedures and systems to ensure the organisation complies with the Australian Privacy Principles and to provide a system of dealing with enquiries and/or complaints
  • All organisations must have a clearly expressed and up to date policy about the management of personal information, including:
  1. The kinds of information the organisation collects and holds
  2. How the organisation collects and holds the personal information
  3. The purpose of the collection, holding, use and disclosure of the information
  4. How an individual may access personal information and correct any information
  5. How an individual may complain about a breach of the Principles
  6. Whether the organisation is likely to disclose the personal information to an overseas entity
  7. If the organisation is likely to disclose personal information to an overseas entity, the countries in which that may occur
  8. Organisations must not collect personal information unless the information is reasonably necessary for one or more of the organisation’s functions or activities
  • Organisations must not collect “sensitive” information about an individual unless an individual consents to the collection and the information is reasonably necessary for one or more of the organisations functions or activities
  • If “sensitive” personal information is collected as a requirement by law or a “permitted general situation exists in relation to the collection of the information”
  • Where an organisation holds personal information that was collected for a particular purpose (the primary purpose), the organisation must not use or disclose the information for another purpose (a secondary purpose) unless the individual has consented, or the individual would reasonably expect the organisation to use or disclose the personal information for the secondary purpose, or if the use or disclosure of the personal information is required  or authorised under an Australian law
  • Before an organisation discloses personal information about an individual to an overseas recipient, the organisation must take all reasonable steps to ensure that the overseas recipient does not breach the Australian Privacy Principles
  • An organisation must take reasonable steps to ensure the integrity of all personal information to ensure the information is accurate, up to date and complete
  • An organisation must take reasonable steps to ensure the personal information is protected from misuse, interference and loss and from unauthorized access, modification or disclosure

If an organisation refuses to correct the personal information as requested by the individual, the entity must give the individual a written notice that sets out the reasons for the refusal, the mechanisms available to the individual to complain about the refusal and any other matter prescribed by the regulations

All organisations must take reasonable steps to implement practices, procedures and systems to ensure the organisation complies with the Australian Privacy Principles and to provide a system of dealing with enquiries and/or complaints

All organisations must have a clearly expressed and up to date policy about the management of personal information, including:

If you are a Payroll Manager or hold a position of responsibility for the management, security, disclosure and use of personal information you can be fined under the Act for non-compliance, apparently up to $340,000.  I’ve not studied the Act yet to understand whether this is per offence, which could be a devastating blow for an individual who is responsible for the disclosure of a substantial numbers of employee’s information, where there is a security breach or a non-compliant business practice.

If your organisation hasn’t made a big deal out of the new Australian Privacy Principles as far as payroll is concerned, especially if you outsource any part of your payroll function, you have a couple of days to establish how your payroll function will ensure compliance.

According to this Smart Company article on 5th March 2014 “The laws will apply to businesses that turn over more than $3 million a year and collect personal data.

However, there are some small businesses which turn over less than $3 million that will still need to abide by the new legislation. For example, the laws apply if the business is a health services provider, related to a larger business, trades in personal information, or is a contractor which provides services under a Commonwealth contract.”

For more information on the changes to the Privacy Act, visit the Office of the Australian Information Commissioner (OAIC) website.

If you are unsure whether the Privacy Act applies to your business, check out the Privacy Checklist for Small Business from the OAIC.

More articles on the Australian Privacy Principles from Australian Law Firms:

Australia: Are you compliant with new privacy laws coming into effect 12 March 2014? By Dan Brush of CBP Lawyers on mondaq.com

Australia: Major changes to Australia’s Privacy Act: Why they matter for foreign IT suppliers doing business in Australia by David Smith of Corrs Chambers Wesgarth on mondaq.com

Australia: Timely Guidance from the Privacy Commissioner – APP Guildelines Released by Sophie Bradshaw of Corrs Chambers Westgarth on mondaq.com

If you have any questions you would like to raise personally, please email Louise Vidler at The Professional Payroll Manager.

© 2014 Louise Vidler T/As The Professional Payroll Manager.  All rights reserved.

All materials contained on this web site not otherwise subject to copyright of other parties are subject to the ownership rights of Louise Vidler T/As The Professional Payroll Manager. Louise Vidler T/As The Professional Payroll Manager authorises you to make a single copy of the content herein for your own personal, non-commercial, use while visiting the site. You agree that any copy made must include the Louise Vidler T/As The Professional Payroll Manager copyright notice in full. No other permission is granted to you to print, copy, reproduce, distribute, transmit, upload, download, store, display in public, alter, or modify the content contained on this web site.

February 17, 2014

Why an In-house Payroll Service Needs to Differentiate Itself from the Competition


No in-house payroll team is safe anymore.  The ever present reality is that if your organisation hasn’t already looked into the viability of outsourcing payroll production, in an attempt to realise significant cost and efficiency benefits, it is only a matter of time until it does.

Payroll BPO is a Global Competitive Market

At the local level you compete against small business operators claiming to be the most experienced outsourced provider in the market and there are bookkeeping and accounting firms, payroll associations and HRIS software providers all supplying payroll BPO services.  Then there are those businesses whose core business is Payroll Business Process Outsourcing (BPO), who vary in size and capacity enormously.  The global market has added extra dimension to the BPO market, creating massive competition in cost competitiveness.

All BPO’s are Flogging the Same Horse

Find me a Payroll BPO who is not selling the promises of:

  • The realisation of efficiencies and time savings
  • Reduced production costs and overheads
  • Continuity, Risk Management and Total Compliance
  • Superior Speed, Technical Expertise
  • Greater operational control for the business
  • Technological Superiority
  • Reduced Recruitment Costs and Staffing Flexibility
  • The ability for your business to concentrate on it’s your core business

Can BPO’s Really Achieve the Miraculous?

The ability of any BPO in the marketplace to achieve this remarkable list of business improvements relies on many interconnected factors… many of which aren’t fully understood by those in the deciding seat.  It is important to understand what real differences exist between in-house and outsourced payroll functions and whether outsourcing is really the miracle it’s sold as.

Here are just a few areas that require thorough analysis in the decision making process, rather than blind belief:

HRIS System Capabilities

The quality and capabilities of a BPO’s HRIS system will depend on the size of the BPO business.  The corporate payroller who decided to start a payroll outsourcing business will be utilising an off the shelf accounting package or a lower cost cloud based system.  National and global BPO’s will be building robust, client tested systems and will have more experience in implementations, which should guarantee a smoother transition… unless that system needs to be customised heavily to achieve your requirements, which can lead to untested and unparalleled disaster.

A true understanding of the capabilities and the shortcomings of the systems used by BPO’s will enable you to make a real comparison between your in-house system and the BPO offerings.

Business Processes

BPO’s would not survive without solid business processes and strict deadlines.  When working with a BPO you will be afforded windows of time for processing and queries and your own business systems must be advanced enough to succeed in your business relationship and to get your payroll delivered on time, every time.

If your in-house system is in chaos due to data integrity issues, receipt of late inputs and misconfiguration of your current payroll system, you will not realise some magical transformation by simply outsourcing this mess to a BPO.  Garbage in will always equate to garbage out.

Economies of Scale

The whole basis of achieving economies of scale is to define the one process that fits all, allowing for only slight deviations for individual business requirements.  If your business can fit itself into the BPO’s processes, all is well, but if your business requires deviations to the BPO’s standard business processes and has a list of required value added services, the cost of the service rises proportionately.

Cost Savings

I’ve managed two outsourcing services and it has always bewildered me why people buy in to this.  Cost savings are achieved by any payroll service, in-house or outsourced, by minimizing the time it takes to produce a payroll and the ancillary costs associated with payroll production.

If an in-house service wants to ensure their longevity, then my advice would be to get your costs down to bare minimum by implementing automations, reducing paper and payslip costs, maximizing your HRIS system and establishing if the current wages cost of the payroll team can realistically be reduced.  The people in your organisation who will be, or who currently are, looking at outsourced options, will see cost as a major incentive.

All BPO’s have a stock standard service that basically includes accepting an upload file or your business entering the data into their system; performing the payroll calculations and producing the stock standard reports.  If this is all you want from payroll, then by all means jump in and realise those cost savings.  If however, you want a little extra here and there, grab your wallet and watch those cost savings begin to diminish.

Let You Get On With Managing Your Business

This selling point is touted by every BPO provider globally, but I believe it’s a myth as the business only outsources a portion of the total end to end process.  Someone at the business still needs to create and manage the inputs; check and authorise the payroll reports; attend to the employee, management and third party enquiries; reconcile the payroll; perform the management and statutory reporting functions; and above all else ensure the compliance of the data and the process.

Additional Charges for Out of Scope Functions

Want a report that’s not in scope? Want to change the pay rates due to an award change or salary increase?  Want to retrieve historical data from two years ago? It can be quite alarming, once the contract is signed by a business owner or manager, who may have little to no concept of the requirements of payroll, just how much additional information needs to be retrieved from the HRIS system.  Much of this will be out of scope and will cost the business, either in the charges for the reporting or for the time it takes in-house to devise a workaround.

Superior Technical Expertise

This one always gets me… how can this sweeping statement be made by some BPO’s when your organisation may already employ a perfectly competent payroll person, or even a whole team of them.

Some larger BPO’s may in fact employ specialists in employment law, or IT and so on, but that may not necessarily translate well into the product or service the BPO customer buys.  Before a business buys in to the guru status, it should understand exactly how much specialist knowledge exists in its own business via its payroll team members and establish how the gurus will provide an actual realisable benefit to their payroll production, if they were to outsource the payroll.

Total Compliance

The way the compliance dream is sold to businesses concerns me, as it appears to the buyer that simply by outsourcing your payroll, you are guaranteed that every facet of your payroll all of a sudden becomes compliant, and you needn’t worry your little head about it ever again.  This is the farthest thing from the truth.

When you hand over the control of your organisations greatest expense and probably most organisations greatest compliance nightmare, you don’t cease to be liable… you don’t cease to monitor and examine… and more importantly, you should never cease to control.

The simplest configuration error, or the insufficiently tested customisation can wreak havoc on pay rates, tax, superannuation, salary packaging…everything.  Compliance in every facet and down to the tiniest detail, remains at all times the business’s responsibility, not the BPO’s.  Put simply, don’t buy in to the total compliance sales pitch.

Offering of an End to End Payroll Service

Hmmm… by whose definition?  I’ve always understood end to end payroll to be all of the processes from the receipt of new employee documentation and employee timesheets, through to the completion of all associated company and statutory reporting, and including all employee, management and third party enquiries and requests in between.

I’ve not seen a BPO yet that encompasses what my definition of end to end payroll is.  Nor have I witnessed a BPO yet that doesn’t require a designated person on the ground in the business to compile all of the data and be responsible for employee queries.

Risk Management

There are so many aspects to the risk management and mitigation of payroll that would be hard to fit into a paragraph, but a few of the main concerns to be addressed for those contemplating outsourcing are:

  • Disaster Recovery Plans and IT Risk Management
  • Risks to confidential employee and business data and bank accounts
  • Risk of BPO business failure/collapse
  • Fraud and Corruption Risks
  • Payroll Controls (including authorisations and error prevention and capture)
  • Compliance Risk
  • Quality Control Frameworks
  • Country Specific Risks

One More Reason Stakeholders Seek Alternative Solutions

Noise.  If your payroll service rings so loud in the ears of the stakeholders, consider yourself a branded target for outsourcing.  If you have a high error rate and there are constant complaints making their way to the leaders of the business, get your error rates sorted very quickly and eliminate the noise.

Understand Your Competition

The point has already been made… every in-house payroll service is in competition with the sizeable BPO market.  In any business, you must understand… truly understand… who and what your competition is and what your competitors are offering, in order to continue to compete against them.

In-house Payroll Managers who are blind or oblivious to this, need to wake up.  BPO’s are knocking incessantly on the doors of the decision makers in your business, trying to get their foot in the door.

Now that you understand more about the BPO Market and how the business you work for is on the prospect list of a gazillion BPO providers, you have two choices… start looking for a job in a BPO or start ensuring your in-house payroll service remains a viable business option for your organisation.

Differentiation is One of the Keys to In-House Survival

For any business to outshine its competition, it needs to identify or create differentiation between them and all the other operators in the market.  Their customers must be able to clearly see the points of difference and those points of difference had better be ones that draw customers in, rather than turn them away.  Your in-house payroll service is no different.

Outsourced service providers all over the world are professing how amazingly more cost effective your organisation’s payroll process will be.  They are claiming that their world standard business processes will not only enable outstanding efficiencies, but reap the rewards of economies of scale and all but ensure the organisation’s payroll compliance.

Do yourself and your payroll team a favour and start raising the bar on your service, analysing and minimising your costs, elevating your team’s capabilities and eliminating any “noise”… and start today!

If you have any questions you would like to raise personally, please email Louise Vidler at The Professional Payroll Manager.

© 2014 Louise Vidler T/As The Professional Payroll Manager.  All rights reserved.

All materials contained on this web site not otherwise subject to copyright of other parties are subject to the ownership rights of Louise Vidler T/As The Professional Payroll Manager. Louise Vidler T/As The Professional Payroll Manager authorises you to make a single copy of the content herein for your own personal, non-commercial, use while visiting the site. You agree that any copy made must include the Louise Vidler T/As The Professional Payroll Manager copyright notice in full. No other permission is granted to you to print, copy, reproduce, distribute, transmit, upload, download, store, display in public, alter, or modify the content contained on this web site.

February 2, 2014

Reading Contextually Between the Payroll KPI’s


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The Minimum Essentials Payroll KPI’s outlined the KPI’s all payroll services should have implemented and touched on benchmarking.  Benchmarking can be dangerous territory for the unitiated, because it is so subjective.

Simply comparing your end result numbers against another organisation, industry or a global best practice and deciding that your payroll service must work to achieve best practice may result in degradation of your service levels and compliance.  You must apply “context” to the benchmarking data, in order to truly achieve any level of benchmark against others.

To apply the “context”, it is essential to understand that behind every number is a complex array of factors including:

Scope of the Study

First and foremost, the scope of the benchmark study and the compilation methods of the data used to calculate the metrics, especially how the cost of payroll production has been calculated.  The cost of payroll production is a base line measurement for a major part of the benchmarking process, so it is important to ensure that everyone is compiling their costs using comparable methods and with the same definition of end to end payroll.  Company “A” may interpret end to end payroll as the process from receipt of timesheets into the payroll service to the deposit of funds into employee bank accounts, whereas Company “B” will rightly incorporate the compilation of employee timesheets and production of post payroll reporting, and include the cost of all employees involved in the process.

Automation & Integration of Systems

Automations and integrations achieved by the HRIS and related systems significantly reduce the cost of payroll production as automation plays an integral role in the efficiency of the payroll service.  If your payroll is fully integrated with time and attendance and employee self-service and the general ledger, you are half way there.  Every process that is performed manually, multiplied by the number of times the process is performed, adds up to a significant potential cost saving over the course of a year.

Volume of Management & Statutory Reporting

Management reporting and the volume of it, varies from business to business and if you have the luxury of HRIS and related integrated systems that automatically produce the reports and email them to the recipient list you are miles ahead of the payroll service that is manually compiling data for management reporting

Statutory reporting is often an onerous task and the more data you can pull down from your systems, either as data into excel spreadsheets or as completed reports from your systems to automate the reporting processes will result not only in efficiency, but should also result in greater compliance by virtue of the reduced manual intervention.  The ultimate HRIS system for me would include one with the capability of calculating the payroll tax, fringe benefits tax and other required reports with all the bells and whistles that submit the electronic returns.

Method of Pay Slip Distribution

The automation of pay slip distribution can be a giant cost and efficiency gain to organisations that is under rated and under utilised by so many organisations.  If your organisation is taking the time to print, separate, seal, collate and physically send pay slips across the organisation, it’s time to start asking your employees if they’d like to receive their pay slips via email and/or investigating the return on investment of employee self-service.

When benchmarking your payroll service against another, factor in the varying methods of pay slip distribution, especially where there are sizeable organisations with a national presence.

Business Process Automation

Automations achieved by business processes need to be taken into account when analysing one organisation’s KPI’s against others:

  • If your payroll service operates with highly manual processes and a considerable quantity of hard copy forms, you will never achieve best practice in efficiency and as a result of that, cost.  Best practice efficiency results from the automation of processes such as employee self-service to enter leave applications, supply of information to reduce employee queries and upload of information by HR/P&C or employees to minimise transactional processing by the payroll service.
  • Physical data entry of timesheets by the payroll service is another detriment to the achievement of efficiencies in comparison to payroll services that utilise excel uploads, time and attendance system integrations and other automated processes.
  • Physical data verification of timesheets and employee information is time consuming and should be minimised as much as possible.  This is said, on the absolute proviso that comprehensive audit and validation checkpoints and reports are produced and verified to ensure that all potential errors will be identified in the process.  If you cannot achieve complete automation, take what you can and implement baby steps within the various components of the payroll process.
  • The number of autopaid employees, which is usually reserved for salaried employees and those permanent employees who don’t vary their hours or work overtime greatly.  This is not a benchmark that can usually be addressed by the payroll service, as it is dictated by legislation, award coverage and organisational policy.

Complexity of the Business and Its Payroll

Greater complexity results in a higher volume of business processes and the aim should be minimise and eliminate the complexities, where possible.  Some complexities such as number of business entities or industrial agreements cannot be changed and the objective is to achieve economies of scale in the payroll processes.

When comparing organisations for benchmarking purposes though, it is useful to understand the level of complexity involved in order to truly benchmark one payroll service against another, for example:

  • Company “A” may be a single registered entity, whereas Company  “B” may be made up of fifty separately registered entities.  Company “A” runs 52 weekly payrolls per year, whereas Company “B” is required to run 2600 weekly payrolls per year, which will result in a huge disparity between the two companies cost of payroll production and their efficiencies.

The Level & Volume of Services

One payroll service that processes only uploaded timesheets, does not have payroll accounting or statutory reporting performed within the payroll service and does not have ancillary employees benefits management functions will appear to outperform and be more efficient than an organisation whose payroll service includes manual timesheet entry, a great volume of management and statutory reporting and complex benefits management.

Additionally, the service level demands on the payroll service are hard to measure but definitely come into play in one service’s ability to outperform another.  The difference between an organisation that has a dedicated support line, or a policy where employees can call their payroll representative directly at any time of day and an organisation that has an archaic policy of allowing employees to contact payroll only at certain times of the day will lend weight to the payroll service’s ability to achieve best practice efficiency.

The volume of enquiries is a standard measurement for payroll best practice and will be determined by a multitude of factors, including the level and volume of services provided plus the error rates being achieved by each service and a multitude of other organisational or industrial issues.

The Salary Costs of the Payroll Team

A big factor in the cost of payroll production is the cost of your payroll team, and again requires a multitude of considerations before simply benchmarking one company against another, such as:

  • Does your organisation pay award rates or market rates?  How do the salaries of your payroll team per FTE compare to those you are benchmarking against?
  • Where is your organisation located? A capital city centre will always demand higher salaries than a regional area.
  • What are the positions included in your payroll team?  Do you have only transactional payroll processing staff, or do you have HRIS Systems staff, analysts, payroll accountants, employee benefits administrators, multiple leaders and managers and such?  The inclusion of payroll team members in addition to the purely transactional staff is always going to show a higher payroll production cost per FTE and as such needs to be taken into consideration when comparing the data.

Additional Variables Impacting KPI Analysis

Other variables that need to be analysed contextually include:

  • The number of employees processed and/or supported per Payroll FTE should be interpreted taking into account all of the factors discussed above.  One payroll team member can quite easily produce 1500 pays per week, while another would struggle to produce 250.  This is based not only on the competence of the team member, but also on the level of automation, complexity and what portion of the end to end payroll function each of the team members are performing
  • Data Quality is of prime importance to the achievement of compliance and efficiency and where one organisation is falling behind another due to data quality, a valid argument with cost based analysis can be achieved to highlight the importance of Input = Output.
  • The volume of Out of Cycle Payments and Special Pays as a metric in a report can be read as a poor performing payroll service who clearly needs to implement some payment policies and undertake some cause analysis on these “errors”.  On the other hand, it could also be read that organisational policy or awards dictate a service standard that the payroll service has to adhere to, or that the organisation needs to support the payroll service in having all staff understand the importance of data quality and timeliness.
  • The cost of Out of Cycle Payments and Special Pays will be a key driver for management to address, where they can, the organisational policy to improve the volume and cost of out of cycle payments.  When you consider that an out of cycle payment takes, at the very least, half an hour from calculation to completed payment, this raises the cost of payroll production significantly if you have high volumes.
  • Retrospective payments are a contributor to cost of payroll production whether you have a system that automates the process or not.  Aside from the calculation of retrospective payments, they usually have to be checked as a separate process within the payroll process and cause fluctuations/variations in the payroll (employee and company totals) due to back payments that again have to be manually verified as a separate process step.
  • The employment turnover of payroll staff will add to the costs and efficiency of the payroll service, but is something that will not be understood in the realm of benchmarking.  An individual organisations turnover can only be understood by understanding the data behind the data.

There is No Like for Like in Payroll

Any comparison you make of your KPI’s to others is a subjective comparison and the contributing factors must be taken into consideration, as best you can, to make a considered judgement of your achievements against best practice.

In payroll benchmarking, there is really is no like for like due to the variances in operating systems; policies, processes and practices; complexities; and of the interpretation of “end to end” payroll.

If you have any questions you would like to raise personally, please email Louise Vidler at The Professional Payroll Manager.

© 2014 Louise Vidler T/As The Professional Payroll Manager.  All rights reserved.

All materials contained on this web site not otherwise subject to copyright of other parties are subject to the ownership rights of Louise Vidler T/As The Professional Payroll Manager. Louise Vidler T/As The Professional Payroll Manager authorises you to make a single copy of the content herein for your own personal, non-commercial, use while visiting the site. You agree that any copy made must include the Louise Vidler T/As The Professional Payroll Manager copyright notice in full. No other permission is granted to you to print, copy, reproduce, distribute, transmit, upload, download, store, display in public, alter, or modify the content contained on this web site.

January 20, 2014

The Minimum Essential Payroll KPI’s


As a Payroll Manager, you are responsible for managing what is the greatest cost of most organisations and with that comes the continued attention of Finance, C-Level Management and the Board.  You are being monitored and usually measured on cost and efficiency and you are always at risk of being outsourced to a more viable option.

As a manager of a service offering in your organisation, you need to be a “business” manager who is focused on achieving organisational goals and outcomes, on providing service to your “customers” that could not possibly be matched by competitors and on the cost of payroll production.

If you are not already measuring, monitoring and acting upon Key Performance Indicators (KPI’s) in your payroll service, you need to start NOW.

KPI’s are quantifiable indicators that reflect the organisational goals and are supposed to be drivers of change and measures of progress.

Payroll has long been viewed as a purely transactional processing cost centre, whose only organisational goals are to minimise the cost of processing and keep payroll noise to an absolute minimum.  While these are primary goals for cost reasons, many other complexities come into play as to why payroll costs what it does.

Only by measuring and taking calculated steps to improve the KPI’s, will you be able to truly reduce payroll costs, as many of the reasons for the cost of payroll are completely outside of the Payroll Managers control such as data integrity, industrial complexity and statutory requirements for example.

Personally, I have a few issues with the apparent simplicity of payroll KPI’s and the comparison of organisations against each other, or against best practices.  The measurement of cost, transaction volumes and time to complete tasks alone does not truly measure the performance of a payroll team as there are an abundance of variables coming into play for every number recorded.

No two payroll operations are like for like.  There are different operating systems, differing policies and company practices, differing complexities and differing definitions of end to end payroll.

I also believe that the global standard for compilation of payroll KPI data misses three very important categories: Service Excellence, Best Practice Business Processes and Compliance.

A payroll service’s primary function is to produce on-time, compliant employee payments… but getting the money into employee’s hands is far from the end of the payroll process.  Management and statutory reporting can be a huge portion of a payroll team’s workload, as can be the day to day enquiries of the workforce and other organisations relating to employee payments and financial matters.

Additionally, every payroll service on this earth, no matter their size, should aim to have best practice documented processes, checklists, segregations of duty and audit steps throughout the process, so this should be included in the KPI’s and be a major objective of the payroll team and the organisation.

These are the Minimum KPI’s Payroll Should Be Measuring as per global industry practice:

(HR/P&C KPI’s are excluded as the focus is solely on payroll production)

THE COST OF PAYROLL – intends to measure the cost to business of the end to end payroll process, which usually encompasses the sum total of wage and operating costs of the payroll team and the cost of implementing and maintaining HRIS and related systems.  For a true cost of end to end payroll, all people in the organisation that contribute to any component of the end to end payroll process should be identified and accounted for such as:

  • IT costs involved in implementation and maintenance of HRIS and related systems
  • Payroll Accounting costs
  • The wages cost of staff compiling timesheets for payroll input
  • Supervisors and management wages cost for time spent on payroll processing and enquiries
  • HR/P&C wages cost for time spent on the transactional components of payroll processing

The combined results of these metrics will assist you to determine the cost drivers of payroll production:

  • Cost of Payroll (Total Wage Cost All Employees) as a Percentage of Revenue
  • Number of Payroll Processes Per Annum
  • Cost of Payroll Production Per Employee Serviced  (Total Operating Cost of Payroll Service per employee serviced by the payroll)
  • Cost of Payroll Production per Payroll FTE

PRODUCTIVITY – intends to measure how productive the payroll team as a whole and individually are, by measuring the ratio of payroll people to the number of employees being serviced.  Additional metrics allow identification of issues affecting productivity.  Standard metrics include:

  • Number of Pays Processed Per Payroll Processor FTE
  • Number of Out of Cycle Payments Processed
  • Number of Retrospective Payments
  • Number of payments requiring manual intervention or follow up
  • Input that contains unclean data

EFFECTIVENESS – intends to measure whether the payroll team are achieving the required outcomes (on-time, compliant payroll production) and identify factors that may be inhibiting their effectiveness.  There are a host of metrics utilised to measure effectiveness and include:

  • Error Rate including Overpayments
  • Payroll Staff Turnover
  • Volume of enquiries and the speed at which they are responded to
  • Automations (including metrics on production time on manual forms/transactions, employee self-service, payroll processing automations, reporting, payslip production)
  • Data Integrity
  • HRIS and related Systems Integration

Additional KPI’s That We As an Industry Should Be Advocating:

SERVICE – regular measurement of the perception of service by those we serve, including:

  • A regular rating by employees to establish the current perceived level of service and identify improvement areas (perceived or real)
  • A regular rating by your internal customers and by supervisors and management on their perception of the payroll service
  • Regular ratings against the achievement of Service Level Agreements
  • Compilation of data on queries such as long term unresolved employee queries, union action as a result of payroll actions and other day to day categories of enquiry in order to identify service demands and improvement areas

COMPLIANCE – as a core function of the payroll service, measurement of the continued achievement of organisational and statutory compliance including:

  • Outcomes of audit reports
  • Compliance with company policies and procedures
  • Achievement of management reporting deadlines
  • Correct, on time and compliant statutory reporting and payments
  • Achievement against monthly internal compliance reviews
  • Breaches of employment legislation , award requirements, etc
  • Breaches of service level agreements

BEST PRACTICE BUSINESS PROCESSES – there is enough global evidence, supporting legislation and standards that demand that all payrolls should be produced utilising best practice business processes to ensure corporate governance, financial transaction security and so on.  The measurement of the payroll service’s achievement towards best practice business processes should identify:

  • All processes and sub processes in the production of payroll are documented and reviewed regularly for compliance and best practice
  • Documented checklists are utilised for payroll processes and signed off by relevant overseers at each vital step of the payroll process
  • Payroll balancing is exhaustive and each authoriser throughout the process understands the full extent of what they are authorising
  • Segregation of duties is well documented, authorisations are achieved and a process for monitoring each step of the payroll process exists
  • Error identification and fraud prevention process checkpoints are  included throughout the processes and checklists
  • Business policies are documented for information security, confidentiality, privacy, authorisations, etc and the requirements of each policy are implemented within the processes

If your payroll service is measuring and monitoring the metrics and KPI’s listed, I applaud your efforts!  If you are part way there, then I urge you to build in these additional KPI’s and identify further improvement areas for your service.  If you are not measuring, open up a new excel spreadsheet NOW! and start pumping in the numbers you need to measure your base line data.

The data on its own though is insufficient, as you need to identify targets for each of your KPI’s and monitor these as you implement your improvements, to ensure your efforts are actually achieving the intended outcomes.

Many payroll services benchmark themselves against others, or against industry, country or global best practice KPI’s.  Before deciding how you will utilise benchmarking, it is important to understand the dynamics behind the numbers.  Essential to your understanding though, is that you must drill down into the numbers to understand the measurement method of the benchmarks you apply; the complexities of the organisations you measure yourself against; the HRIS systems and processes in place; and a host of other reasons that another payroll service may be producing twice as many employee payments as your team, with half the staff.

Remembering that KPI’s are quantifiable indicators that reflect the organisational goals and are supposed to be drivers of change and measures of progress, it is imperative that you understand what the goals actually are for the payroll service and include measurements that will provide actionable data that identifies what issues exist and what improvements need to be implemented.

If you have any questions you would like to raise personally, please email Louise Vidler at The Professional Payroll Manager.

© 2014 Louise Vidler T/As The Professional Payroll Manager.  All rights reserved.

All materials contained on this web site not otherwise subject to copyright of other parties are subject to the ownership rights of Louise Vidler T/As The Professional Payroll Manager. Louise Vidler T/As The Professional Payroll Manager authorises you to make a single copy of the content herein for your own personal, non-commercial, use while visiting the site. You agree that any copy made must include the Louise Vidler T/As The Professional Payroll Manager copyright notice in full. No other permission is granted to you to print, copy, reproduce, distribute, transmit, upload, download, store, display in public, alter, or modify the content contained on this web site.

January 13, 2014

The #1 Unknown Australian Salary Packaging Consequence Your Employees Need to Know About


While business is to be commended for the efforts to share the benefits of salary packaging with employees across the board, it still confounds me that employees are entering into salary packaging arrangements oblivious to the REAL financial impact on their finances.

If you are going to offer a broad based Salary Packaging program to your employees, you MUST educate your employees, or at the very least strongly encourage them to seek independent financial advice from the ATO, their financial planner, tax adviser or accountant.  An employee will be far more encouraged to seek advice, if they understand along with the pros, that there are some serious cons.

The greatest unknown by most Australian employees is the impact of Reportable Fringe Benefits on their assessable income and the consequence of that increased assessable income on their entitlement to government benefits, multiple tax offsets, child support obligations and entitlements and HELP/SFSS repayment calculations.

Employers present calculations to the employees showing the net pay difference between a packaged and non-packaged salary, often without any reference to the potential consequences of their increased Reportable Fringe Benefits amount on their payment summaries.  Employees sign up to the salary packaging programme wholeheartedly, rejoicing in their “extra” income… until they submit their tax return.

Once their tax return is processed, many employees learn a very hard lesson.  Their windfall in undertaking salary packaging, has just earned them lost tax benefits; or an increased debt to the ATO for HELP/SFSS; or the Child Support Agency advises they now owe considerably more Child Support or will receive considerably less; or Human Services advises they owe for overpaid benefits.

While some payroll people may think that the likelihood of this consequence is minimal, consider the number of employees you have with HELP/SFSS debts; that we live in a society where almost half of marriages end in divorce; and that a majority of families with children under the age of 18 are entitled to Family Assistance.

Over the years I’ve implemented this in a few businesses and employees still come to the payroll team at year end and ask why payroll didn’t take enough tax, or why they weren’t advised, when they quite obviously were.  To counteract the employees who don’t read fine print, simply ensure this information is not fine print.  A one page document that they sign and date, prior to undertaking any salary packaging, that clearly outlines the potential consequences and that they need to seek independent financial advice, is all you can do without physically clubbing them over the head or booking the appointment with the financial planner for them.

I can only encourage you to make the effort to implement this information into your salary packaging documentation and enable your employees to ask better questions of their financial advisers and to make more informed decisions.  You will be thanked for it by the reduction in furious or devastated employees, waving their Payment Summaries around at tax time.

This is what you MUST make your employees aware of as a minimum:

Salary Packaging may (because some items are classified as “exempt benefits”) result in an increased “Reportable Fringe Benefits” value on your Payment Summary, which will be used (in addition to your Gross Earnings) to calculate your assessable income for the following:

  • Medicare Levy Surcharge
  • Medicare Levy Surcharge lump sum payment in arrears tax offset
  • Deductions for personal super contributions
  • Super co-contribution
  • Tax offset for contributions to your spouse’s super
  • Mature age worker tax offset
  • Higher Education Loan Program (HELP) and Financial Supplement (SFSS) repayments
  • Dependent tax offsets, including
    • Dependent spouse
    • Child-housekeeper
    • Parent, spouse’s parent or invalid relative
  • Housekeeper tax offset
  • Senior Australians tax offset
  • Pensioner tax offset
  • Your child support obligations and entitlements
  • Your entitlement to certain income-tested government benefits (including Family Assistance)

Before undertaking salary packaging, you are advised to seek independent financial advice from the ATO, a financial planner, tax adviser or accountant.  If any of the above income assessable items affect you, it is imperative that you seek independent financial advice on the impact of salary packaging and increased Reportable Benefits.

The Fringe Benefits Tax year is April 01 to March 31 each year.  The total Reportable Fringe Benefits for this period will be documented on your Payment Summary the following June.

Employees who receive individual fringe benefits of $2,000 or more in a Fringe Benefits Tax year, will have the “grossed up” value of the fringe benefits reported on their Payment Summary.  This is the Reportable Fringe Benefit and the “grossed up” rate is 1.8692.

Therefore, if you receive $10,000 in taxable Fringe Benefits for example, this amount is multiplied (“grossed up”) by 1.8692 and becomes your Reportable Benefits total of $18,692 on your Payment Summary.

The additional amount of $18,692 is added to your gross earnings to calculate your income tested entitlements, outstandings and tax offsets as listed above.

If you have any questions you would like to raise personally, please email Louise Vidler at The Professional Payroll Manager.

© 2013 Louise Vidler T/As The Professional Payroll Manager.  All rights reserved.

All materials contained on this web site not otherwise subject to copyright of other parties are subject to the ownership rights of Louise Vidler T/As The Professional Payroll Manager. Louise Vidler T/As The Professional Payroll Manager authorises you to make a single copy of the content herein for your own personal, non-commercial, use while visiting the site. You agree that any copy made must include the Louise Vidler T/As The Professional Payroll Manager copyright notice in full. No other permission is granted to you to print, copy, reproduce, distribute, transmit, upload, download, store, display in public, alter, or modify the content contained on this web site.

March 18, 2012

Salary Packaging and Tax Effective Employee Benefits


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Human Resource teams go to great length to research and offer Employee Benefits Programs to employees to achieve their organisational goals and Finance Managers work their hardest to evaluate and implement cost minimisation strategies. The provision of well researched and planned employee benefits can achieve both!

The age old debate between Tax Minimisation and Tax Avoidance remains, but where you can legally obtain a tax deduction why wouldn’t you! Employers should be looking to these tax advantages and promoting them to their most valued assets, if they truly feel that they are the organisations’ most valued assets.

Kerry Packer, the iconic Australian billionaire media magnate and rival to Rupert Murdoch said in a tax investigation in 1991 – “I am not evading tax in any way, shape or form. Now of course I am minimizing my tax and if anybody in this country doesn’t minimize their tax they want their heads read because as a government I can tell you you’re not spending it that well that we should be donating extra.”

A Disclaimer for Me

The information contained in this article is based on Australian knowledge only and any action taken as a result of this article is to be thoroughly investigated as to its’ currency and legitimacy with the appropriate taxation legislation in Australia and any other country you seek to apply any information from this article to. While I am only discussing Australian options, there will be similar options in other countries and these will provide food for thought for your particular country, organisation and circumstance.

A Disclaimer for You

Individuals Are To Be Explicitly Encouraged to Seek Professional Financial Advice!

I’ll say it another way… You absolutely must advise individuals to seek professional advice from their taxation department, their financial planner or accountant prior to taking up any financial related salary packaging or employee benefits programs. Each employees’ financial situation varies significantly and there are financial consequences in salary packaging and encouraging people to utilise tax advantages that may not suit their individual financial situation.

Why Would We Bother?

A carefully planned salary packaging system can provide various cost savings to an organisation. Many automatically think that the company has to incur the fringe benefits tax (FBT) on employee benefits. On the contrary, the salary package can be structured to incorporate the FBT component, or employees can make voluntary after tax contributions to minimise the FBT liability, or both.

I will restate the “Knowledge is Power” and “Fore Armed is Forewarned” from the previous article. A benefit of working for your company does not have to be a physical benefit; it can be the provision of empowering information that assists the employee to make decisions for a better future. Some of the information in this article is simply that, tax advantages that are open to individuals no matter which company they are employed by, that they simply may not realise it exists.

If you are the one that opens their eyes, then they will hold you or the company higher and value the contribution you have made to them. If you dedicate some time to seek, offer and advise employees of tax effective salary packaging and tax deductions or offsets, they will believe that you truly do care and that you are serving their best interests. You will gain credibility, build business relationships, contribute to employee morale and more. From a human resources perspective, there are so many reasons to bother and these are listed below.

Liaising with Human Resources & Finance

There are very few organisations where the Payroll Manager will be able to get most of these offerings across the line without liaising with HR & Finance, with some managers even wondering how you dare to have the audacity to bring them to the table. I recommend you do your homework and have prepared submissions that sell the implementation to both your HR & Finance people.

Highlight the benefits to both the organisation and the employees, do your numbers, study the social wellbeing aspects, calculate your numbers and present the ideas that will require organisational approval. If you can work with the management of HR & Finance to bring some or all of these ideas to fruition, your employees will be thankful, at the very least.

Key Arguments for Finance

  • Potential cost savings of carefully planned salary packaging
  • Zero cost effect to the organisation of the tax minimisation offerings
  • Potential to reduce turnover, thus reducing the cost of employment and the cost of payroll production

Key Arguments for HR 

  • Actively contributes to Employee Engagement
  • Contributes to Corporate Social Responsibility
  • Steers you in the right direction to becoming an Employer of Choice
  • The provision of valuable financial information contributes to relationship building, trust and loyalty
  • Employees achieve more with the same rate of income and perceive they are being rewarded

What’s In It for the Employees?

  • Employees obviously receive greater benefit from their salary or wage
  • The increased perception of working for an organisation that does actually value them

Beware of Award or Industrial Instruments Excluding Employees

In Australia, we are undergoing a modernisation of our industrial relations system and the employment awards within it (although some would question the use of the word “modernisation”). There have been awards that specifically exclude salary sacrifice arrangements, so ensure you review your employees’ industrial instruments for exclusions.

What are Non Salary Packaged Tax Minimisation Options for Employees?

The Australian Taxation Office has common tax offsets available to individuals. It is well worth investigating the offsets in your country and utilising your knowledge base (from Innovation 1 – Creating a Knowledge Base) to advise employees who may not know these exist or that they are entitled to claim them.

Pre-Declaration of Income Tax Returns by Employees (ITWV Variation)

In Australia this is known as an Income Tax Withholding Variation Application (ITWV) or if you are old like me, the former terminology is the 221D Variation. Do not presume that wage earners are automatically excluded from this as I’ve met many people with multiple investment properties, hands in businesses and all sorts of tricky financials who are school teachers, tradespeople and process workers.

The ITWV Variation Application allows employees to apply for a variation on their tax rates by anticipating their future tax return. Instead of waiting until the end of the financial year to claim, if approved, they will receive a reduced tax rate during the current financial year and will receive additional net pay on a per pay basis.

Publish information and forms on your knowledge base for employees who may not know that they can apply for tax variations on their earnings.

After Tax Voluntary Superannuation Contributions

Any employee can contribute additional after-tax monies to their compliant superannuation fund. There is no immediate financial benefit from this, but it has the potential to change an individuals’ future. If the employee is a low or middle income earner though, they may be eligible for the Superannuation Co-Contributions Scheme, where personal after-tax superannuation contributions may be matched by the government, up to $1,000.

After Tax Voluntary Spouse Superannuation Contributions

Additionally, if an employees’ spouse works part-time and is on a low income, they may be eligible for rebates on contributions (to a threshold) that they make to their spouses’ superannuation.

Deferred Income Payments

It is legal, under Australian taxation law to defer employee payments (by request of the employee) so the tax implications in one financial year are minimised. It is only viable to do this if the following financial years’ earnings are not going to be impacted greatly by the withheld payment. If an employee is going on parental leave, taking an extended period of leave without pay, or retiring this is an option that could have significant financial benefit for the employee.

Workplace Giving

Although this is technically salary sacrifice, it does not usually fall within the same structure or framework as the offering of salary sacrificed employee benefits as it is governed by separate legislation and is to be made available to all employees.

If your organisation is active in the community and values its’ corporate responsibility, you could work with your management team to encourage the board to commit to matching contributions. Your employees will feel that the company is working with them to improve the community. This program has so many benefits in the eyes of employees, it’s hard to understand why after years of the legislation being enacted, so many organisations still haven’t got a Workplace Giving Program in place.

Open discussion with registered business owners or ABN Holders to test the legitimacy of them contracting to your organisation.

This is an area of risk, but again, if researched and managed properly is a potential winner for organisations and employees. There are many people employed by organisations that have businesses registered and are true or legitimate contractors. Organisations should really investigate the cost savings of employing these people as contractors, providing they can pass the employee-versus-contractor test under the taxation system.

Use your Current Creditor List as a Potential Employee Benefits List

Almost every organisation has creditors (and debtors for that matter) who wouldn’t mind expanding their businesses and creating a few new customers. If your business is sizeable enough, it is worth speaking to a few of these other organisations to see if they would like to offer benefits or discounts to your employees, to potentially increase their customer base. Employees will see the benefit in discount or special offerings for:

  • Vehicle leasing or purchasing
  • Banking or Financial Products
  • Tools and equipment
  • Computers and computer software
  • Practically anything is of value to someone!

Partner with Personal Service Professionals to Provide Employee Benefits

Find professionals that are willing to offer their services at a discounted introductory price, with the potential to create a larger client base. Any professional who understands the lifetime value of a customer, would jump at the chance to service a reasonably large potential client base.

If you directed 100 new clients to a professional on the first occasion, the lifetime value of that customer base alone would far outweigh any introductory discount on the initial service. A percentage of the initial 100 clients will refer the professional to their friends and family. If that professional returned every six to twelve months and secured new employees as customers their business will grow exponentially just from your partnering invitation.

What can you offer?

  • Will & Estate Planning
  • Financial Planning
  • Budgeting Assistance/Debt Reduction Strategist
  • Health Insurance Analyst
  • Home Loan Analyst
  • Tax Preparation Services
  • Legal Services

You could also partner with local businesses to provide discounts or loyalty programs such as Car Washes, Cafes, Dry Cleaners, Automotive Repairers, Home Maintenance & Cleaning, Tradespeople… the list is endless and your employees will love it.

Salary Packaging Employee Benefits… now it becomes more complex

Public Benevolent Institutions (Charities) and Hospitals in Australia In Australia

Public Benevolent Institutions, Hospitals and similar industry bodies are legislated separately for salary packaging. If your employer falls under this legislation, fringe benefits are offered and taxed separately and differently to the standard Fringe Benefits Tax legislation.

Employee Benefits are “Fringe Benefits”

Under the Australian Taxation System In Australia, employee benefits are not income taxable but are fringe benefits taxable (including benefits provided to spouses, family members and associates as a result of the employment of the individual).

Minimise the FBT liability by Employee Contributions

FBT liability is incurred by the employer and is a major discourager to organisations. Employees who make voluntary FBT contributions can minimise or eliminate the employers FBT expense. Your organisation can offer salary packaging with a company policy that provides that employees will incur the FBT liability and incorporate it into their salary package or have them make after tax contributions.

Organisations can Claim Back the Goods & Services Tax (GST)

Where the organisation provides a benefit, then the amount expended on the benefit becomes the organisations expense. The benefit provided to the employee is a good or a service purchased or leased by the organisation and therefore, the organisation is entitled to claim the GST back on that expense (taking into account Goods & Services Tax legislation, record keeping requirements and the actual “claim ability” of certain items).

Without an effective and efficient management system, managing the GST claim back of employee fringe benefits can be an administrative nightmare. As with all complex administrative processes, a good think, a good plan and good management will resolve the issues.

A warning for employers who provide employee benefits

If you provide cash benefits to employees, such as Expenses Payment Cards, the obligation is on the employer to ensure employees are purchasing legal goods and services. An expenses payment card program should not be implemented without the explicit requirement to produce valid receipts to support the expense, which should tie in to the expenses payment card statements, which the employer should receive digital copies of for record keeping and benefits management purposes.

A warning for employees who receive employee benefits

If an employee receives an employee benefit under a salary sacrifice arrangement (including all purchases on expenses payment cards), the employee is not entitled to any of the following:

  • Claim an income tax deduction for the expenses
  • Claim GST on the item as they did not purchase it
  • Depreciate the asset on an income tax return

It is important that employees understand this, as they may be falsely claiming deductions on tax returns.

Example 1: Right to claim Educational Expenses Tax Deduction In Australia, we have the ability to claim deductions for certain educational expenses for our children. If an employee has an expenses payment card issued by the employer as an employee benefit and uses that card to purchase a computer, monthly internet connection fees and stationery for their claimable school child, they will not be able to claim these items as a legitimate tax deduction. These items were legally purchased by the employer and the employer has the right to the expense as a business deduction and any associated GST. For the employee to claim a legitimate tax deduction on these items, they would have to purchase them out of income taxed earnings.

Example 2: Claiming a purchase as a legitimate business expense If an employee also happens to own a business and purchases business items on an employer provided expenses payment card (or physically receives these items as an employee benefit), the employee is not entitled to claim these items as legitimate business expenses, not claim the input tax credits on them. These items are not eligible for depreciation under the employees business either, as they are not legitimate business expenses. The goods or services were legally purchased by the employer and as such are legitimate business expenses for the employer not the employee.

Example 3: Using Employee Benefits for Investments (Properties or Other Investments) Serious issues arise when employees utilise employee benefits (including expenses payment cards) to fund investments (properties or otherwise) or purchase items for investment properties. Again, an individual cannot claim a tax deduction where the investment or the purchase has legally been made by the employer, through the provision of an employee benefit.

Example 4: Claiming Home Office Expenses on a Rented Home where the Employer Makes Rental Payments under a Salary Sacrificed Arrangement An employee has their total rental payments paid under a salary sacrifice scheme and all other expenses are paid by the employee from after tax wages, including their utility bills. If the employee or their spouse is a business owner and seeks to claim their home office and a portion of the utilities as a tax deduction, they are not entitled to do so. It is not a legitimate tax deduction as the employer is legally paying the rent on the home. They are entitled to claim a portion of the utilities however as these were paid from after tax wages. If your organisation offers benefits that could impact individuals in these ways, it is imperative that you advise them of these issues. Mortgage/Rental payments and expenses payment cards are the two primary areas of concern, but there are others.

Basically, employees need to understand that if they are not paying tax on it, they shouldn’t be able to claim a tax deduction on it!

What Can You Offer With Your Salary Packaging?

An employee can be provided any legal benefit and if the organisation agrees, just about anything can be paid or provided under a salary sacrifice arrangement, again provided it is legal. Any offer of salary sacrifice should be accompanied with strong encouragement to the employee to seek professional financial advice, as some benefits can actually expose the employee to financial losses in other areas.

An example of this is the salary sacrificing child care fees in Australia, which would increase the employees’ assessable income with the additional fringe benefits value added to their gross reportable income. This in turn, could reduce the employees’ claim to childcare rebate, making the employees’ child care fees even more exorbitant than they already were.

If you have a staff cafeteria, it is common to offer meal expenses payments as an employee benefit whereby staff make their purchases as they choose and the bill is paid by the employer to a pre-determined annual value.

Other offerings can include:

Health and Wellness Programs

  • Weight Watchers or similar
  • Quit Smoking Programs
  • Nutritionist
  • Gym Fees
  • Health Insurance

Life & Other Insurances

  • Life Insurance (there is now a minimum requirement in super funds)
  • Funeral Benefit
  • Total & Permanent Disability (TPD)
  • Accident Cover
  • Trauma Insurance
  • Income Protection

Note: Income Protection insurance is claimable as a tax deduction at Item 24 on the Individual Tax Return, so professional advice should be sought on the tax effectiveness of salary packaging Income Protection Insurance.

Payment of Student Loans

Employers could offer payment of student loans (HELP/SFSS Debts in Australia).

Employee Benefits Exempted from Fringe Benefits Tax

The Australian Fringe Benefits Tax legislation has the “minor benefits” exemption. A minor benefit is a benefit which has a ‘notional taxable value’ (grossed up value) of less than $300. Where you provide an employee with separate benefits that are in connection with each other (for example, a meal, a night’s accommodation and taxi travel) you need to look at each individual benefit provided to the employee to see if the notional taxable value of each benefit is less than $300.

Don’t think you can provide a myriad of minor benefits to an employee though, as a consistent provision of benefits of this kind, could be construed as an expenses payments fringe benefit.

Please note that employers must report on Payment Summaries, all Fringe Benefits items $2000 and over (grossed up value, per the Payment Summaries gross up method) and this has to be taken into consideration by employees for determination of assessable income for other financial situations.

Industry related education and training courses would be accessed by more people if they were more affordable. Offer employees access to it appears that someone else is footing the bill for it. While this is salary packaging, I’ve separated it from the salary packaging section, as an industry or “in the course of your profession” course does not fall under standard employee benefits incurring fringe benefits tax.

Professional memberships and subscriptions to trade journals or industry publications can be provided to employees either as a company offering or under a salary sacrifice arrangement, if the budget doesn’t extend to servicing all of your employees’ professional subscription and membership requirements.

There is provision in the Fringe Benefits Tax Assessment Act (Section 58N) to provide Emergency Assistance as exempt employee benefits. Benefits you provide by way of emergency assistance are exempt from FBT. Emergency assistance is assistance for immediate relief of a victim, or potential victim, of an emergency where the assistance is any of the following: first aid or other emergency health care; emergency meals, food supplies, clothing, accommodation, transport or use of household goods; temporary repairs; any similar matter.

Read up on this before you offer it though as there are restrictions on the provision of “health care” and these few paragraphs do not cover the complexity of Emergency Assistance as exempt employee benefits.

Salary Sacrificed Superannuation

Salary sacrificed super contributions are not a fringe benefit and are treated as employer contributions. Employers receive the tax benefit of paying additional funds into employees’ complying superannuation funds. There are complex restrictions on salary sacrificed super though and both employers and employees must remain vigilant of the contribution caps, maximum thresholds, concessional components and age based limits.

The tax on entry of funds into a superannuation fund is 15% (and 16.5% on exit), so an employee pumping salary sacrificed super away needs to take into consideration their retirement needs and the tax rate that would apply to this money if they earned it as salary or wages.

Beware of the caps! There are caps on the amount of concessional (before tax) and non-concessional (after tax) contributions you can make each year. If you exceed the cap, there is an excess contributions tax of an additional 31.5% of the amount exceeding the cap.

Access to Financial Assistance Outside of Your Organisation

This was mentioned in the Innovation 1 article, but is such a pertinent item in todays’ crazy world with environmental disasters, high divorce rates, the rise in terminal illnesses, the collapse of the housing markets and all the other day to day tragedies we face as a community. Your employees may be in desperate need of financial assistance and most of us don’t like to advertise our desperation, so if we post on our knowledge bases ways to access financial assistance, we are providing an invaluable community service to our employees.

Look on your local council, state & federal government and welfare department websites for information that would assist your employees. Private companies also are able to assist in times of financial crisis, such as mortgage providers freezing loan repayments, superannuation funds releasing funds for crisis and so on.

Advising Employees of Available Tax Deductions & Tax Offsets

It costs nothing to post information on your knowledge base about employee eligibility to legitimate tax deductions and tax offsets. Many organisations are wary of their liability in providing such information, which is easily waived by posting tax department published PDF files or internet links to your taxation departments publications.

Some people do not realise that they are entitled to claim for the travel between work and their training institution, or the difference between what they normally would travel for work and the extended travel to a training course or business meeting. This is a value add for your “customers” that may have a significant impact on them.

Self Education expenses is another area where employees may benefit from more information as they do not realise the extent of the deductions they are entitled to.  Additionally there is the Housekeeper Tax Offset; Education Tax Refund; Family Tax Offsets; and Investing on Behalf of Children.

Now to Get Started…

The offering of employee benefits is a minefield, but it’s a minefield worth crossing if you truly want to offer your employees the best value out of their salaries and wages and provide an employee benefits program that engages rather than alienates employees.

If you are unsure what your employees would be interested in, ask them! Even if you got together a working party and included a cross section of your employees in that working party to begin the big picture design. If you do your homework and it falls on deaf ears, at the very least you can begin to populate your knowledge base with the wealth of information that employees could utilise on eligible tax deductions and tax offsets. If they know about these options, they can plan for them and save their receipts.

Should you decide to embark on this path, I wish you well in your endeavours and as always would love to learn more from you or help you in your journey. You can open discussion via this site or contact me directly at louisevidler@optus.ap.blackberry.net

© 2012, Louise Vidler

Excerpts from the Australian Taxation Office:

About tax minimisation and tax avoidance schemes

You are entitled to minimise your tax liabilities through investment activities and to receive the benefits provided for under the law. Tax minimisation is when you legitimately arrange your tax affairs to reduce the amount of tax you pay. These arrangements comply with both the letter and spirit of the law. However, investment schemes and legal structures that do not comply with the law are considered to be aggressive tax planning arrangements – referred to as tax schemes. A tax scheme is an artificial or contrived arrangement to avoid or defer tax obligations. Schemes often involve a series of complex transactions. They typically move funds through several entities, such as trusts, in order to avoid or minimise tax otherwise payable. Schemes may also involve distorting the way funds are being used to enable a taxpayer to claim deductions they are not entitled to.

What is a salary sacrifice arrangement?

A salary sacrifice arrangement is also commonly referred to as salary packaging or total remuneration packaging. It is an arrangement between you and your employer, whereby you agree to forgo part of your future entitlement to salary or wages in return for your employer providing you with benefits of a similar value.

What are the requirements for an effective salary sacrifice arrangement?

The requirements of an effective salary sacrifice arrangement are: • the arrangement is entered with your employer before you perform the work • there is an agreement between you and your employer • there should be no access to the sacrificed salary – if a fringe benefit that has not be provided by your employer is cashed out at the end of a salary sacrifice arrangement accounting period, the amount cashed out is your salary and is taxed as normal income.

If you have any questions you would like to raise personally, please email Louise Vidler at The Professional Payroll Manager.

© 2012 Louise Vidler T/As The Professional Payroll Manager.  All rights reserved.

All materials contained on this web site not otherwise subject to copyright of other parties are subject to the ownership rights of Louise Vidler T/As The Professional Payroll Manager. Louise Vidler T/As The Professional Payroll Manager authorises you to make a single copy of the content herein for your own personal, non-commercial, use while visiting the site. You agree that any copy made must include the Louise Vidler T/As The Professional Payroll Manager copyright notice in full. No other permission is granted to you to print, copy, reproduce, distribute, transmit, upload, download, store, display in public, alter, or modify the content contained on this web site.

March 16, 2012

Bringing in the WOW! Factor


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People can smell emotional commitment from a mile away. Tom Peters, Author

Compiled with edited extracts from various works of Tom Peters, as who else could describe the WOW Factor better than the man who invented the term.

The ‘WOW Factor’ is a registered trademark of the author Tom Peters, who coined the phrase some ten years ago. He came to fame as the co-author of In Search of Excellence and has since published multiple brilliant books on how to deliver ultimate customer service in all facets of business operations.

What is the WOW Factor?

  • It is that feeling where your heart races and your face smiles when you have received fantastic or even brilliant service.
  • It is when people or companies have stepped out from the crowd of look alikes and done something to make you smile!
  • When something is done or said to make you a brilliantly satisfied customer (or employee)!
  • It is when something is done to make you a devoted customer!
  • It is when something is done that you simply did not expect!

How do I get the WOW Factor happening?

  • Make the words glow, tingle, thrill, dazzle, delight and wow the primary basis for evaluating the quality of your products and services.
  • In the age of email, supercomputer power, the internet and the global village attentiveness – a token of human kindness – is the greatest gift we can give someone.
  • Obsess on the little stuff! 1000 little things are greater than one big thing
  • It is simply when you walk out as a customer and just say… WOW!

How do I get the staff customer focussed?

  • Forget barking orders.
  • Forget issuing a Customer First Vision Statement.
  • Prominently post customer statistics all over the place.
  • Distribute all good and bad customer letters to everyone.
  • Plaster pictures of customers (buyers, products, facilities, etc) all over the place.
  • Start making weekly awards for little acts of customer service heroism

If employees are inundated with practical customer information rather than vague exhortations, they won’t be able to keep their distance. They’ll begin to ‘think customer’ – and maybe even ‘dream customer’.

February 20, 2012

How The Magic Payroll Button Really Works


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It’s time for a little trumpet blowing and foot stomping by payroll professionals.  Alarmingly, there are still so many managers and business leaders who think we have a magic payroll button that takes little to no skill to press. For some, the belief is that anyone with half an ounce upstairs could run a payroll! When something goes wrong, the question is raised “Why is it so hard!?”.

Sadly, it’s often the managers of the payroll team with this flawed perception.  They might serve their team and themselves well to spend a little time getting a new perspective on what I honestly and unbiasly believe is one of the most committed work groups in a company.  What other department stays as long as it takes through hell and high water to process an EFT file, again and again, without thanks.

Lets take a look at the diversity of knowledge a payroller is actually required to have… and how we get that seemingly magic button to work…

Service Excellence

We are expected to be consummate customer service representatives, with superior conflict management skills; responding to technical questions on the spot; remaining calm in the face of irate employees, who sometimes hit you with a tirade of swearing. We must be mind readers; hide our anger as we are treated as lower class citizens by people who think that God created us unequal; hide our laughter at the ridiculous requests; and empathise with the employee who needs their money yesterday because they can’t feed their kids or put petrol in the car to get to work.  We solve problems day in and out and its’ when we can’t, or don’t, that others in the organisation begin to hear about it.

Business Relationships

Payrollers liaise with employees, managers, the finance team, the human resources team, solicitors, workers compensation insurers, auditors, the Child Support Agency, medical funds, unions, employer associations, banks and finance companies, social security, superannuation funds and the taxation office.  These people and organisations make demands upon us and expect the same service excellence that our employees expect from us.  It doesn’t matter if we have a Service Level Agreement stating when we will respond to requests, because most of these relationships are bound by law and so are the timeframes in which we have to jump.

Time Constraints

Payrollers actually performing the payroll process are under constant stress during the time between the receipt of the input data, to the time the funds are transferred to the bank.  If we are lucky enough to have all the data provided correctly and on time, its a fairly calm payroll day, but that is not a standard practice in the world of payroll.  There’s usually a pretty tight timeframe, a whole list of queries awaiting resolution by people who won’t return phone calls and emails. Achieving a zero error rate demands a great deal of validation and questions.

Policies & Procedures

Apart from having to know the company policies & procedures intimately, there is usually a fair amount of time spent by pro-active Payroll Managers referencing policies or documenting and updating payroll procedures as innovations are implemented and best practices are discovered.

Employee/Industrial Relations

We have to be constantly mindful of the consequences of our actions on employee relations and foresee human resource management issues that may emerge, or are already in effect. Every interaction with an employee and every payslip is a potential ER/IR disaster if not managed well.  This is a top of mind issue for all payrollers.

Accounting Principles

In order for payrollers to competently process payrolls, we must understand accounting principles to effect many of the transactions we do in our standard day.  Debits and Credits run deep in the simplest of payroll general ledgers, multiplied by the complexity of organisations with numerous companies and differing cost account structures.

Advanced MS Excel

Ask any Payroll Manager what their major reporting tool is and the answer will invariably be MS Excel, so add advanced Excel to the list of tricks a professional payroller has.

IT Systems Administration

Unless you have dedicated reources for your payroll, HRIS or time & attendance system, many payrollers are tasked with this function.   Report writing in some payroll systems is an acquired skill from years of practice and often the only avenue for extracting decent data from the payroll system.

Project Management

At any time, there will be multiple payroll projects in the pipeline.  System upgrades, new EBAs, legislative changes to address and more.  Payroll Managers and their staff are juggling diverse management needs, moving target dates, sometimes a lack of resourcing, shifting management priorities and insufficient hours in the day to keep their projects from falling over.

Legislative & Industrial Framework

We are expected to have in-depth working knowledge of the endless legislation that affects the organisation: Fair Work Act and its’ predecessors, Workers Compensation by state, OH&S, Payroll Slips Regulations, Annual Leave, Long Service Leave and Public Holidays by state, Superannuation Guarantee Acts … phew!

There are those of us to have to be more than familiar with Sarbanes Oxley, Immigration Act, Australian and International Standards and the legislation surrounding corporate governance. Added to this is each of the Industrial Instruments an organisation works under. We must know how the binding legislation or award modernisation system works in with these awards and which bits count these days and which bits don’t.

Complex Taxation System

An absolute imperative is intimate knowledge of taxation for every possible payment type paid under every fathomable scenario. Payrollers contend with legislation, calculation and queries on income tax, fringe benefits tax, medicare, student loans schemes, GST, payroll tax by state…another phew! …and that’s not all of it.  If the business employs expats or has overseas operations then international tax issues become prevalent.

Remuneration & Benefits

Payrollers worth their salt understand Salary Packaging and its complexities. We have to, to apply it correctly in the system, tax it correctly and ensure the benefits are applied correctly.

Global Best Practice

It is expected that effective validations have been performed to minimise or eliminate errors.  It is imperative the payroll is delivered on time.  It is expected that it is 100% accurate. It must be time and cost efficient. Process and metrics must compare to global best practices.

HR/Payroll Analysis

On top of ensuring the company and statutory reporting is delivered on time, there”s those constant ‘little’ urgent queries. The ‘little’ queries that require considerable time investigating or pulling information to answer the original, simple question.  Then there’s the analysis, budgetting, forecasting, scenarios, cost impacts, etc that come with frequency, but never enough warning.

All of the functions and requirements listed above are only a part of the skill based that Payrollers must have to be successful in their roles.  Understanding a day in the life of a payroller may go a little way to explaining the personality of some of us as well.  Payroll people are renowned for being…let’s say frank… and that’s partly because a decent majority of us haven’t got time for flowery and fluffy. There’s so much work to get through and often we simply want the facts, the required outcome and a timeframe.  To achieve 100% accuracy, a service excellence rating to die for and a reputation to be proud of takes a wealth of knowledge, committed effort, resilience, many tears and mastering the art of juggling tasks and priorities.

In all of this, the only buttons that I’ve ever witnessed possessing some kind of magical powers are the shutdown button on my computer, the light switch button and the elevator down button at the end of a tragic payroll day.

If you have any questions you would like to raise personally, please email Louise Vidler at The Professional Payroll Manager.

© 2012 Louise Vidler T/As The Professional Payroll Manager.  All rights reserved.

All materials contained on this web site not otherwise subject to copyright of other parties are subject to the ownership rights of Louise Vidler T/As The Professional Payroll Manager. Louise Vidler T/As The Professional Payroll Manager authorises you to make a single copy of the content herein for your own personal, non-commercial, use while visiting the site. You agree that any copy made must include the Louise Vidler T/As The Professional Payroll Manager copyright notice in full. No other permission is granted to you to print, copy, reproduce, distribute, transmit, upload, download, store, display in public, alter, or modify the content contained on this web site.

February 10, 2012

Why HR and Finance Must Both Hold Payrolls’ Hand


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One ongoing political battle in many organisations is who the Payroll Service should report to. Finance wins over mostly because of the sheer expense that is payroll. Then there are those organisations that see the payment of their most valued assets as an integral function of the Human Resources team, so the Payroll Service sits under HRs’ wing. Politicking aside, if organisational leaders actually sat down and measured the pros and cons on either side, it would be evident that the Payroll Service must have a solid working relationship and open communication lines with both the HR and Finance teams.

An important consideration in the #HR-v-#Finance pull of the #Payroll Service is to attempt to understand the mentality of both players, in the most general sense. Pull out your organisations’ HR and Finance mission statements and try to find commonality between them… I dare you!

Human Resources people are typically “people people” whose purpose in life is to implement strategies and programs to recruit and retain proficient, nurtured, engaged and empowered employees and to keep them safe and well in the process. In HR, grey lines exist at every turn: special circumstances and impacts of decisions with on flow effects to other employment relation issues and/or future strategies. HR people regularly have to consider the bigger picture, often for what are seemingly the minutest of details to outsiders.

Finance people are typically “numbers people” who usually perform comfortably within the predetermined and unwavering confines of accountings’ legislated rules, local and international standards, authority levels and organisational policies. They are comfortable with black and white. Being very generalistic, the purpose of Finance is to compliantly account for and report on all financial transactions within the designated timeframes.

Picture putting your HR and Finance people in a room and performing a group personality test. The room would separate into three distinct groups. In one corner are the “creatives” and “counselors”, most of which happen to work in HR, and in the other corner are the majority of the Finance team who are the “methodicals”. Polar opposites in the personality spectrums.

Left standing in the middle of the room are the in-betweeners: a mix of bewildered people who may be wondering if they have chosen the right career path, and conversely, those people whose personality types allow them to move comfortably amongst the HR and Finance personalities. (Just a note… seriously consider the latter for Payroll Management positions.)

Back in the organisation, sitting in the middle of the HR and Finance personalities is your Payroll Team, a complex mix of all the personality types. Every sizeable payroll team seems to have at least one member who cannot function outside the documented rules, without exception and at least one who spends all their time bending over backwards to ensure the staff are kept happy, possibly at the expense of some of the rules.

One of the hardest tasks for Payroll Managers is to have their team provide outstanding service within the confines of such a regulated employment, taxation and accounting environment and in the timeframes established in the majority of industrial agreements. The primary objective of a payroll service is to consistently deliver fully compliant, on time, best practice, and cost and time efficient payroll processes at a minimal cost per employee, with a zero error rate and zero impact on employee relations. To achieve this in unison with the grey areas of HR, and the black white of Finance, is a constant struggle.

While it is important to understand the differences in personality and objective between Finance and HR, Payroll does not get to sit in the middle as an innocent pawn. Payroll Managers need to understand (and teach their team to understand) HR strategy and to know the impact of their service to employee relations, with the same veracity a Payroll manager will have their team understand the legislative, accounting and compliance issues.

While ever the conflicting requirements between HR and Finance continue on either side of the payroll function, this will not be achieved with any consistency. Your HR, Finance and Payroll Management need to come together and devise a workable strategy that keeps everybody working towards their common and individual goals. HR has to come to the party on the black and white deadlines and compliance, while Finance needs to work into to their authorisations and policies some of the grey HR requirements.

Only by understanding the personalities and the objectives of each of the business units and combining these into a workable solution for the benefit of the whole business, can the payroll team then begin to provide a consistently outstanding, service excellence focused and fully compliant payroll service. The absolute one certainty in all of this is that it doesn’t matter who the Payroll Team report to in the organisational chart. It matters that there is a solid working relationship between the HR, Finance and Payroll Teams so the best of both worlds can be achieved.

Food for thought for your organisation? I welcome your feedback!

If you have any questions you would like to raise personally, please email Louise Vidler at The Professional Payroll Manager.

© 2012 Louise Vidler T/As The Professional Payroll Manager.  All rights reserved.

All materials contained on this web site not otherwise subject to copyright of other parties are subject to the ownership rights of Louise Vidler T/As The Professional Payroll Manager. Louise Vidler T/As The Professional Payroll Manager authorises you to make a single copy of the content herein for your own personal, non-commercial, use while visiting the site. You agree that any copy made must include the Louise Vidler T/As The Professional Payroll Manager copyright notice in full. No other permission is granted to you to print, copy, reproduce, distribute, transmit, upload, download, store, display in public, alter, or modify the content contained on this web site.

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